Density & Uses: Comprehensive Planning for an Inclusive LIC

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The Your LIC team hosted an online webinar on Density & Uses: Comprehensive Planning for an Inclusive LIC with almost 200 community members participating on June 30, 2020.

Watch Workshop 5 online >

See more on Workshop 5 >



The Your LIC team hosted an online webinar on Density & Uses: Comprehensive Planning for an Inclusive LIC with almost 200 community members participating on June 30, 2020.

Watch Workshop 5 online >

See more on Workshop 5 >


We want to hear your questions about Density & Uses in LIC!

Community Q & A

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    What is the max size for store front lengths and retail spaces? Driver behind the height limits for the presentation?

    Kelley Asked 25 days ago

    We want to have a wide range of retail and sizes of retail spaces. We wanted to maximize public open space as much as possible and the proposed buildings heights and footprints reflect that priority, with consideration also given to the residential vs. commercial uses of various sites.

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    What’s the criteria for residential/commercial use?

    Kelley Asked 25 days ago

    Creating jobs in the area during a time of record unemployment is a high priority, and we wanted to have a higher percentage of commercial use in order to generate economic activity in the area, create opportunities for the local workforce, and support the development of a live-work community.

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    Why not put the onus on those who can afford and sacrifice their bottom line?

    Kelley Asked 25 days ago

    During this fiscally challenging time for the city, the private sector is making significant investments in open space, infrastructure and other public amenities. As the designated developer of two of the three public sites in the district, TF Cornerstone changed its program to prioritize job-generating commercial uses alongside critical investments in open space and infrastructure. Commercial use in Long Island City is still developing and this switch, along with other critical infrastructure investments, does impact the profits of the development group.

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    You’ve focused on how you’re building a large amount of commercial space to create a mixed-use district but does this work in a post-COVID economy? Are we accounting for a WFH economy?

    Kelley Asked 25 days ago

    Queens was hit very hard by coronavirus, and the majority in the Queens economy makes up businesses that are deeply affected by the lockdown conditions like restaurants. As Queens looks to recover we want to position the borough to be more economically independent and decentralize job growth, including office job growth,  from Manhattan to Queens.

    While some amount of work from home will persist, many industries will continue to depend on hands-on activities as well as in-person interaction and collaboration, and we look forward to supporting these industries, among others, with a variety of spaces that adapt to new needs and emerging operational and design considerations. 

    We are working hard to develop a district that prioritizes walking and biking, allowing people to get to work without having to use public transit. New commercial space would maximize jobs along the waterfront, shortening commutes for people who live in or near the neighborhood and allowing for a reverse commute from other boroughs into Long Island City. Our goal would be to create new bike lanes and seamlessly connect with the existing bike network in the neighborhood.

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    There is a strong need for housing in the area, is 5,700 units a set number or self-restricted number?

    Kelley Asked 25 days ago

    We felt this was the right amount of residential area to create a vibrant, mixed-use community. We wanted to make sure we balanced residential uses with  non-residential uses to foster a 24/7 community and center for economic activity. We look forward to further input from the community on the proposed mix of uses as we advance our engagement and begin the formal land use process.

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    Has there been any engagement with the School Construction Authority?

    Kelley Asked 25 days ago

    The project is currently planning for up to three school sites and we have had preliminary talks with SCA. We’re currently planning for a middle school and will talk to the City about what would be appropriate for the other sites.

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    How can people vote to move the space to Hunter’s Point area? The waterfront area is a gem and should be repurposed for public use.

    Kelley Asked 25 days ago

    Expanding public open space and access to the waterfront on parcels within our control is a top priority for our team based on what we’ve heard from the community. 

    This open space would build on the last two decades of waterfront open space creation to the south and connect the waterfront of Hunters Point South and Queens West to northern Long Island City. It would weave active and passive open spaces into a continuous public landscape along the East River. One of the benefits of comprehensive planning across property lines is that we were able to expand the amount of public open space and maximize public access to a contiguous waterfront park by working together. Our open space would be anchored by a vibrant civic square and connected by a linear esplanade, offering more than seven acres of activities and programs that serve community needs.

    It would also provide significant resiliency and infrastructure improvements and many other ways to welcome the public beyond the open space, including thousands of new jobs and a workforce development center to ensure that these jobs are accessible to the community, a recreation center, space for arts and culture, and more.

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    The project consists of publicly owned land, why wouldn’t the developers keep the land for public use? What’s the rationale for handing over public land to developers?

    Kelley Asked 25 days ago

    We believe that public land must be used for public good. TF Cornerstone was designated to develop two of the three public sites within this 28-acre area through an open RFP process. In response to community objectives and city priorities for economic growth and job creation, TF Cornerstone has committed to not pursue any market-rate housing on the publicly-owned sites. Instead, the sites will be focused on creating significant public open space, school uses and jobs. The City will not hand the sites to a developer, but continue to retain ownership of the public sites in perpetuity. The publicly-owned DOE building is not part of this proposal and none of the four developers part of the Your LIC process have control over it.

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    Will Apprenticeship Opportunities be provided from this project ?

    Sinade Wadsworth Asked about 1 month ago

    Creating an inclusive workforce development structure is a top priority for us. In May, we hosted a virtual Workforce Advisory Committee meeting with around 30 expert participants and received feedback on how this project could provide a pathway for job and career opportunities for local residents. We look forward to releasing our recommendations based on this meeting and community feedback soon.

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    Do you have information on how building all of these towers will be advantageous in a flood zone? I'm sure you are aware of the fact that the land is porous and not suitable for structures this size. It is evacuation zone A during hurricane season and floods pretty severely even in normal heavy rain. Not to mention the lack of ability of this neighborhood's sewer system to handle this much added density. You will be bringing unwanted pollution from construction and will block the beautiful river view from other longtime residents. Many of the existing condos sit empty and there is simply not a need for this. Please take this plan to another neighborhood. We want to preserve the character of the neighborhood so if you really want to, put the money into developing green space and/or maximum four story commercial/residential buidings that will actually benefit the neighborhood.

    LL Asked about 1 month ago

    We are committing to making significant investments and improvements in the site’s resiliency infrastructure. The team seeks to reduce the impact to the inland community from storm surges and flooding, while protecting it from future sea level rise. Over 40 acres of the district and upland community could be protected from storm surge through a protective barrier that incorporates resiliency into the landscape design. With respect to CSOs, investments in new separate storm sewers and green infrastructure could remove up to 17 million gallons of combined sewer overflow in the neighborhood annually, thus not only avoiding contributing to the area’s current flooding issues, but actually reducing them.