Comprehensive Neighborhood Planning: Mobility and Sustainable Infrastructure

The Your LIC team conducted community outreach activities focused on comprehensive neighborhood planning for mobility and sustainable infrastructure. The outreach included online submissions at YourLIC.nyc and an online webinar with more than 80 community members participating on March 9, 2020.

See more on the workshop summary >

Watch Workshop 4 online below


The Your LIC team conducted community outreach activities focused on comprehensive neighborhood planning for mobility and sustainable infrastructure. The outreach included online submissions at YourLIC.nyc and an online webinar with more than 80 community members participating on March 9, 2020.

See more on the workshop summary >

Watch Workshop 4 online below


We want to hear your questions about Mobility and Sustainable Infrastructure in LIC!

Community Q & A

  • What is sustainable infrastructure?

    eleonorabersh asked about 1 month ago

    Traditional infrastructure is large centralized public facilities, long distances from the end user. This has resulted in significant environmental and social impacts on the communities where they are located.

    Sustainable infrastructure is the establishment of high efficiency neighborhood or “district scale” systems that create positive environmental and social impacts based on the higher density and proximity of mixed uses commonly found in urban areas such as:

    • Reduced impact on aging public infrastructure by engineering shared use and recycling into the solution.
    • Reduced carbon footprint related to transmitting electricity and water locally
    • Reduces the reliance, particularly during peak demand, on inefficient centralized utility plants and thus contributes to environmental justice by reducing the location of these large utility plants in low income or disadvantaged communities
    • Increasing the availability of potable water without increasing the basic infrastructure by recycling of wastewater and stormwater on site.
    • Energy conservation and production where it is used


    These systems are large enough to have significant benefits and small enough to be rapidly constructed.

  • Can the developers influence the City and State to provide more subway access to Long Island City?

    gmellow asked about 1 month ago

    We look forward to a fruitful dialogue with the MTA as part of the public process.


  • What’s the public transit situation going to be? How do I get from home to work and back?

    24 days ago

    We are looking to find as many multi-modal solutions for moving visitors, workers and residents around and to and from the district. One goal is to reduce reliance on public transit by creating a place where people can live and work.


  • How many apartments/residents are planned for the 28 acre site? Hard to assess without that information.

    24 days ago

    We look forward to discussing the topics of density and uses, including public amenities, commercial and residential at our next public workshop planned for 3/23.


  • Aahhh, the new Amazon employees can walk or bike from the Z hotel to their new offices near Anable Basin.

    24 days ago

    While none of the developers have any agreements at this point, the point is that people will be able to walk or bike to work -- any new developments, residents, and workers should be integrated with the surrounding community and we need to build better connections with LIC more broadly.


  • You guys gotta stop with the silo thinking. Comprehensive planning means looking at development holistically, comprehensively. This is somewhat interesting but not meaningful.

    24 days ago

    We agree comprehensive planning means looking at development holistically. We believe so much can be achieved by four developers working together across property lines to create an integrated plan for the 28 acres in response to the needs and ideas expressed throughout our community visioning process.


  • What if you don't ride a bike and how does this help us get into Manhattan?

    24 days ago

    We are planning comprehensively with every mode of transportation available to us. In addition, by introducing jobs in LIC, we aim to reduce the dependency on transportation to Manhattan.


  • Mr van Bramer also has repeated that public land is for public use, so where are we standing on that?

    24 days ago

    TF Cornerstone agrees that public land must be used for public good. TFC has committed to not pursue any market-rate or luxury residential uses on the two public sites that it has been designated to develop. Instead, these sites are focusing on creating significant public open space, a school, and job-generating uses. In addition, the land will be subject to a lease and remain under public ownership in perpetuity.


  • So the public gets a little sliver of its public land for some walking lanes and some bike paths, and the developers get their towers. Sweet.

    24 days ago

    Each developer has committed to providing neighborhood-enhancing uses on their properties, for example, public open space, schools, and more. 


  • How about a blank slate for the need for resiliency?

    24 days ago

    Without a strong resiliency plan and sustainable infrastructure improvements tied to smart development, the area will be increasingly vulnerable to coastal and inland flooding, and further erode over time.


  • You cannot talk about infrastructure in the abstract. It needs to be connected to the existing plans that will cause insane density and extensive burden on all infrastructure. Please try to be more honest to the public.

    24 days ago

    We are exploring best practices in sustainable infrastructure and discussing them with the community to the to decide what makes sense to implement as part of the comprehensive plan. We will be discussing density with the public at our next public workshop on 3/23, and look forward to hearing feedback on a proposed plan following the completion of the public workshops.


  • Let's take the future and science more seriously. Who in his right mind builds so heavily in a flood zone and only keeps talking about storm and wastewater. There's more comprehensive water management needed.

    24 days ago

    Without development that utilizes a strong resiliency plan and new sustainable infrastructure, the area and the risk of coastal flooding to surrounding community will continue to increase.


  • What role has Corey Johnson played in this process? Why is lobbyist Kasirer allowed to have a former top lobbyist on Johnson's staff while they promote the interests of Bruce Teitelbaum of L&L MAG? Why is the EDC allowed to give away public land when land is so scarce? We didn't beat Amazon to get 13 enormous luxury skyscrapers. This is a rigged, closed process and the people of Queens reject it, full stop.

    24 days ago

    The Your LIC coalition has and will continue to operate in good faith, and is committed to working with the community on a comprehensive plan that strengthens the neighborhood for everyone.

    With respect to questions about public land, TF Cornerstone was designated to develop two of the three the public sites along the waterfront in an open request for proposal (RFP) process from the New York City Economic Development Corporation in 2017, with the goal of advancing a project that would benefit the community and the city with a diversity of job-generating uses. The lots that TFC was selected to develop do NOT include the DOE building, which remains under City ownership and control.


  • We need to increase the density, don't we? I think the city is so expensive because housing and office space is in short supply.

    24 days ago

    We look forward to discussing the topics of density and uses, including public amenities, commercial and residential at our next public workshop planned for 3/23.


  • How does this webinar fulfill the need to reach out to as much of the community as possible?

    24 days ago

    All of our public workshops to date have been in-person with 100-200 attendees from the community. Due to the declared state-of-emergency in New York regarding coronavirus and rapidly changing circumstances related to this issue, we decided we had to put public health and safety first and move this workshop online to a webinar. Thank you to the nearly 100 people who tuned in for our webinar!


  • So TF is saying no to luxury development, but yes to a million square foot office building (Amazon anybody??) How is that transparent? How is that through public engagement?

    24 days ago

    A primary goal of our vision is to create space for a range of new employers and entrepreneurs to thrive in LIC. We have heard from the community on the need for good jobs, pathways to careers, and economic empowerment. In addition to delivering public open space and a school, the public sites aim to bring a diversity of good jobs to the neighborhood.


  • Here's what's problematic too. During all these YourLic Workshops that vast majority of attendees are either employees at the developers or on the payroll of developers through pr companies. It's nothing new, but the whole idea of public engagement is not realistic and people have figured that out.

    24 days ago

    We are proud to report that hundreds of LIC residents -- with no affiliation to the Your LIC coalition -- have come out to attend our public workshops and participated in our online engagements to share their voice for the future of their community.


  • The problem of course is that Ms Mellow is highly paid to say all these things (conflict of interest) so this doesn't help!

    24 days ago

    Dr. Mellow is a paid consultant working on this project, responsible for leading community engagement and workforce development. She has a strong track record of creating opportunities in LIC and inspired community engagement, and we are proud to have her on the team.


  • All this is fine. We just don't need any more upzoning.

    24 days ago

    We have heard from the community that LIC needs good jobs, resilient public open space, new schools, mixed-income housing, and more. Our goal is to develop a comprehensive plan designed to deliver the right balance of those public benefits as part of any upzoning.

  • What about sexy new buses with windows that extend much lower for a safer viewport for bus drivers and more enjoyable view for riders and other features that we haven’t thought of yet.

    24 days ago

    Thank you for this suggestion. We aspire to foster future-oriented mobility options. While we defer to the MTA on their bus design, we are open to considering a potential shuttle service that is greener, safer and more enjoyable. 


  • So if what Mr Loiselle is saying re the limitations of sustainable planning are true, then why would you build so densely in a flood zone?

    24 days ago

    The district is being comprehensively designed with the open space as an integrated system with multiple benefits that could not be achieved by individual building or parcel redevelopment. These benefits include reduction of storm surge, sea level rise, inland flooding and combined sewer overflow. This will have positive impacts extending well beyond the district into the community.


  • If you know in advance that what you are building is not sustainable in the long run, and it will cost more money in the long run (caused by climate caused damage) then why continue? Just don't build. Let it go.

    24 days ago

    We are proposing a development that considers all aspects of sustainability, from water and energy demand, to healthy buildings. As such, we are taking the necessary measures not only to manage the effects of climate change, but also future proof the district to accommodate broader measures that may be forthcoming from the city state and federal government.

  • How has this been collaborative if there is already a plan made up in the backroom? + Can you also please show the rendering with the 70+ stories buildings. Just as a matter of full transparency. + Can you please skip to the real issue. It has just been reported that 4 developers are privately hatching potential plans for a series of mega towers lining the LIC waterfront. It's based on records. + The idea by YourLIC that these plans are months old is not less disingenuous. How were in any way members of the public involved in the drawing of these plans? What was the decision making process?

    24 days ago

    To be clear: no matter what you have seen on Twitter, no plans have been completed or proposed. 

    The developers take their responsibility to the community very seriously, and have been engaged in an intensive engagement process for the last six months to ensure that Long Island City residents have the opportunity to help shape a waterfront plan that brings economic empowerment, schools, resiliency, open space and more. During the planning process, the developers look at many different scenarios and options -- this is a normal part of the process that will allow them to respond to what we have heard from all of you throughout the community visioning process. They will present a proposed plan following the completion of the public engagement process for the community to weigh in on, even before the formal public review (ULURP) process.

  • You seem to be using the word "collaborate" a lot, but it really seems that you are just fooling everyone and you can cross off "public engagement"?

    24 days ago

    Hundreds of LIC residents have taken time out of their busy lives to attend and share their voices at our public workshops over the last six months. We are proud of our community engagement, which will continue with our final workshop on 3/23.


  • How can you talk about mobility and sustainable infrastructure if you don't take into account the plans you already have??

    24 days ago

    No plans have been completed or proposed. We want to have an open dialogue with the community about best practices in infrastructure, and mobility so we can develop a sustainable comprehensive plan for the 28 acres.


  • Why is public land given to TF? + Please explain the relationship that the edc has fostered with tf cornerstone that the edc is literally handing over public city property to them (the doe building and dot lot): that is public city land and is not the edc's to just hand over to a developer. please explain to residents why this was done, especially with zero public input.

    24 days ago

    TF Cornerstone was designated to develop two of the three the public sites along the waterfront in an open request for proposal (RFP) process from the New York City Economic Development Corporation in 2017, with the goal of advancing a project that would benefit the community and the city with a diversity of job-generating uses. The lots that TFC was selected to develop do NOT include the DOE building, which remains under City ownership and control.


  • No market rate luxury housing - ok. But also no office towers. Who in his or her right mind builds in a flood zone?

    24 days ago

    DOB building code enforces a design flood elevation that is 1-2 feet above the flood plane elevation of a 100-year storm. The real opportunity here is that we have 28 acres, 3100 linear feet of waterfront area along the East River from which coastal flooding occurs. We have four developers coming together putting together a unified plan for protection against coastal storm surge. 

    Our proposal from the presentation in December was to protect not only the development area, but a significant portion of the district behind it. We’re doing that through an integrated system of levies, bulkheads, open spaces, potentially a multi-functional edge condition that will be publicly accessible, ecologically vibrant, and double our flood protection system to benefit the neighborhood and the district.


  • It would be helpful if you could list/display the presenters' names, affiliations, and roles.

    24 days ago

    • Bishop Mitchell Taylor, 
    • Dr. Gail Mellow, 
    • Ebony Young, TF Cornerstone, 
    • Riley MacPhee, SHoP Architects, 
    • Jason Loiselle, Sherwood Design Engineers, 
    • Bernardo Matalucci, SHoP Architects.


  • Nice graphics, but they don't address the insane increase of density that your plans will cause.

    24 days ago

    We look forward to discussing the topics of density and uses, including public amenities, commercial and residential at our next public workshop planned for 3/23.


  • I'm really missing a mapping of increased mobility from and to all NYCHA housing in Queens West.

    24 days ago

    We have been considering a private shuttle. Looking at the transit map, there are definitely some areas that have holes. 

    The answer is that we’re open to all transit options and trying to think about a multi-modal approach where we’re bringing potentially a protected bike lane all the way down from north of Queensbridge into the district and extending that through into Queens West. And then also tying that in to a much wider network. We see the waterfront esplanade as a key connector north and south of the district that can be used by pedestrians, bikes, and less traditional transportation methods like scooters or others.

  • How far along are the developers in talking with the MTA about these transit improvements? Is the MTA on board?

    24 days ago

    We look forward to a fruitful dialogue with the MTA as part of the public process.


  • Maybe you should plan the next meeting for after the coronavirus? + If the coronavirus is still an issue on 3/23 then there will be a real need to have a community meeting therefore can rescheduling be possible?

    24 days ago

    Our next meeting is planned for 3/23 and we'll be monitoring the situation closely with the hopes that things improve.


  • Is an extra subway station closer to the water in the cards? Are the MTA buses going to be re-routed to the district?

    24 days ago

    This is controlled by the MTA, we look forward to a fruitful dialogue with the agency as part of the public process.


  • How does the system of pulling water from the river for heating and cooling differ from similar methods that have drawn criticism from environmentalists and river advocates when it has been done at nuclear power plants?

    24 days ago

    The heat dissipation required for nuclear power is different in magnitudes in comparison to residential and commercial building demands. The differences in temperature we are trying to mitigate are very minor. 

    We have a team of world-class marine engineers and hydrogeologist who are studying the potential impacts and can design a system that that will not have an impact on the East River Ecology and actually improves water quality. As a result, the energy use and associated carbon footprint would exceed OneNYC 2050 Plan for a Pathway to Carbon Neutrality. 

    There will be no contamination of the water, in fact it will go through a filtration system and return the water cleaner than when it was taken extracted. The water will be transferred back into the river at a depth and location where it will have insignificant impacts on the East River ecology. In addition, any river heat exchange system will be reviewed and monitored by the NYS Department of Environmental Conservation throughout the life of the system.

  • It would be wiser to use more up to date data. Bring in Corps of Engineers and the state. Stop with selling these ideas as if this is really a special treat to the public on their own public land!

    24 days ago

    We’re representing a collection of four private developers in a city-facilitated process where we have the ability to leverage three private parcels and one privately leased public parcel covering over 28 contiguous acres and over 3,000 linear feet of riverfront. It’s significant and this comprehensively leverages the value of all parcels, but it’s not at the scale of having the ability to protect LIC in its entirety or much less Queens or even down to Newtown Creek. Coastal flood management is a large-scale problem. 

    Related to the Army Corps of Engineers, it would be interesting if anybody wanted to pursue this a little further, to review the studies that have been ongoing for the last two years by the Army Corps of Engineers entitled “NY and NJ Harbor and Tributaries Focus Area Feasibility Study (HATS)”. It’s been studied for two years and there are five strategies the Corps of Engineers has put forth as potential options to protect the entirety of NYC which would include LIC as one piece. 

    The goal we are shooting for here is to leverage all the land that we have available to us, work with the city, and inform the city of NY through the process that we’re engaged in to identify improvements that can be done at a larger scale well beyond the neighborhoods and the district that this group of developers has the ability to affect and inform them of some clear interventions that could be pursued by the City and State.


  • Why can't we see everyone's questions? How is this community engagement?

    24 days ago

    We will get to every question. We’re answering questions in 3 ways -- live during the presentation, in the webinar Q&A, and on YourLIC.NYC


  • What should our goals be in terms of sustainability? what is the global best practice?

    24 days ago

    Right now, we are in the stage where we are trying to define the appropriate best practices that address the context of this neighborhood. But I can say that working at this level, with this unprecedented collection of four different developers working together on an NYC waterfront redevelopment that we are able to co-optimize myriad opportunities for sustainable development due to the wide array of mixed uses and density to create vibrant sustainable neighborhood. This creates a balance of the vitality and activity in a site and also provides you the opportunity to have infrastructure systems that are optimized to achieve maximum sustained benefits to the community.


  • \Will the existing streets stay the same? Or do you have a plan to build new roads in and around the site?

    24 days ago

    One of the benefits of four stakeholders working together is the ability to improve the roads comprehensively throughout the district for the neighborhood. The streets will be modified to enhance connectivity and create a comprehensive plan across the 28 acres. We want to make the streets wider, make them more pedestrian and bike-friendly, and more.


  • Will you be showing all questions in this Q&A on your website? Not all questions are visible to all, not all questions seem to be answered (even when they are marked as such)

    24 days ago

    We’re answering questions in 3 ways -- live during the presentation, in this Q&A, and here on YourLIC.NYC


  • How much do I need to make to live here?

    27 days ago

    Our goal is to create a diverse, inclusive, mixed-use district accommodating a wide range of income levels. We encourage you to attend our workshop on 3/23 to discuss density and uses, including housing.

  • Any plan for 44th Dr.?

    27 days ago

    44th Drive is the spine of this development. We agree it’s very important and could use real improvement, and we’re hopeful as we advance our rezoning, we will engage with the City agencies that control the public streets to make enhancements. Ideas may include installing a protected bike lane, traffic calming measures, and more.

  • Nice graphics, but they don't address the insane increase of density that your plans will cause.

    27 days ago

    We look forward to discussing the topics of density and uses, including public amenities, commercial and residential at our next public workshop planned for 3/23.

  • Are these just ideas or commitments?

    27 days ago

    We are committed to building the best buildings we can build in LIC, and that can include the menu of options you heard about today.


  • What is an estimated amount to afford to live here?

    27 days ago

    Our goal is to create a diverse, inclusive, mixed-use district accommodating a wide range of income levels. We encourage you to attend our workshop on 3/23 to discuss density and uses, including housing.


  • What is the status of the Brooklyn Queens Connector (BQX)?

    about 1 month ago

    The BQX team, led by NYC DOT and NYC EDC, is currently continuing the community discussion about the proposed route and conducting the environmental review to advance the BQX. The BQX team is currently holding public workshops and meetings within several of the neighborhoods along the proposed route in both Brooklyn and Queens in an effort to engage the community in the planning process. More information about the proposed route and events may be found on the City’s website (https://www.brooklynqueensconnector.nyc/).

  • Who decides where the bus routes go?

    about 1 month ago

    The bus routes are ultimately decided by MTA, which is controlled by the State. The MTA recently released a Draft Queens Bus Network Redesign Plan with the intent of redrawing the existing Queens Bus Network. This plan is available for review and comment on the MTA website (https://new.mta.info/queensbusredesign), and the MTA is in the process of holding public workshops throughout Queens during the first quarter of 2020 to receive community feedback on the Draft Plan.